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Posts Tagged ‘Arbor Day’

Much like today’s celebrities, Hollywood stars of the Reforesters_of_America1920s never missed an opportunity to align themselves with a cause that everyone could get behind. In 1923, industry leaders joined with conservation leaders like Gifford Pinchot and William Greeley to establish the American Reforestation Association, which sought to leverage Hollywood’s PR machinery and the exploding popularity of films (as well as radio and print media) in order to educate Americans about the need for and importance of planting trees. Reforesting America became the obsession of Hollywood royalty like Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks.

In honor of Arbor Day, we bring you Hollywood’s brightest stars circa 1925. The photos come from a promotional book published by the Association that year. Don’t you love how they dressed for the occasion? I know I put on my Sunday best for gardening.

 

The list below shows all the stars and starlets who appeared in the book.

The list above shows all the stars and starlets who appeared in the book.

To read the original captions, click on the photo.

Douglas Fairbanks plants a tree.

Swashbuckling star of the silver screen Douglas Fairbanks.

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Mary Pickford, the original “America’s Sweetheart,” was a cofounder of United Artists with Douglas Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin.

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Comic legend Harold Lloyd, minus his trademark horn-rimmed glasses.

Harriet Hammond (spelled differently in the book) was a Max Sennett Bathing Beauty. You may know her from such films as "Gee Whiz!" and "By Golly."

Harriet Hammond (spelled differently in the book) was a Max Sennett Bathing Beauty. You may know her from such films as “Gee Whiz!” and “By Golly.” I know I always wear furs and heels when planting trees.

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Jackie Coogan, who later went on to play Uncle Fester on “The Addams Family” television show, was one of the highest paid stars in film in 1923.

Actors from the "Our Gang" series helped out, too. Oh, those Little Rascals!

Actors from the “Our Gang” series helped out, too. Oh, those Little Rascals!

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“There is no aristocracy in trees. They are not haughty. They will thrive near the humblest cabin on our fertile prairies, just as well and become just as refreshing to the eye and as fruitful as they will in the shadow of a king’s palace.” — J. Sterling Morton

Before there was Earth Day, there was Arbor Day, the original environmental holiday that started it all. In honor of the national observance of Arbor Day this Friday, we would like to honor its founder, Julius Sterling Morton.  Morton,  a farmer, journalist, politician, territorial official, and the third Secretary of Agriculture, was born on this day in 1832 in Adams, New York.

J. Sterling Morton found his life’s calling through the fateful decision in 1854 to settle with his wife in the new Nebraska Territory. There, Morton began working for the territory’s first newspaper, the Nebraska City News, quickly rising to editor. Through frequent editorials throughout the 1850s,  he advocated for tree planting on the area’s open prairies.

Julius Sterling Morton

Julius Sterling Morton

Morton also became involved in the territorial government, serving in Nebraska’s Legislative Assembly before being appointed as Secretary of the Territory by President Buchanan in 1858. After a series of political defeats, Morton took a position on the State Board of Agriculture, where he was able to put his interest in tree planting into action.

At a meeting of the Nebraska Board of Agriculture on January 4, 1872, Morton introduced a resolution that April 10th “be set apart and consecrated for tree planting in the State of Nebraska and that the State Board of Agriculture hereby name it Arbor Day.” The resolution passed unanimously.

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